3.5L EcoBoost Specs

5.0L Coyote Motor Specs

Ford 6.2L V-8 Specs

Ford 4.9L Specs

 

 

 

 

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Ford 4.6L & 5.4L V-8 Specs

Ford Modular Engine Family

 

 

 

 

The 4.6L & 5.4L V-8 engines are part of Ford's Modular overhead camshaft engine family, as is the 6.8L V-10 optional in 3/4 & 1 ton Ford trucks through 2010. The 4.6L & 5.4L become optional V-8 powerplants in the Ford F-150 for the 1997 model year. The term "Modular" refers to the ability of the engine production facility to rapidly change its tooling to produce different versions of the engine, and does not refer to the fact that the engines share many components. Though the architecture of the 4.6L & 5.4L is very similar, the 5.4L features a longer stroke and therefore requires a taller deck height than that of the 4.6L. The 5.4L utilizes a small bore, long stroke design, while the 4.6L utilizes a nearly square design (approx. 1:1 bore to stroke ratio). The engines have earned an overwhelming reputation of reliability and become a popular engine amongst long term Ford F-150 owners. Both engines have been featured on Ward's 10 Best Engines List on multiple occasions, and received a variety of honorable mentions from various industry analysts. The "Triton V-8" title has been used to label the modular engines in Ford F-150s since 1997.

 

4.6L V-8 Specs

Engine:

4.6L 16v SOHC, 24v SOHC, 32v DOHC V-8

Production Plants:

Romeo Engine Plant in Romeo, Michigan
Windsor Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario
Essex Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario

Displacement:

4.6 liters, 281 cubic inches

Block Material:

Cast iron

Cylinder Head Material:

Aluminum

Firing Order:

1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8

Bore:

3.55 inches

Stroke:

3.55 inches

Deck Height:

8.937 inches

Compression Ratio:

9.4 : 1 (2v)
9.8 : 1 (3v)

Valvetrain:

Single overhead camshaft, available in 16 valve (2 valves per cylinder) or 24 valve (3 valves per cylinder). Ford also built a high performance 32 valve, DOHC 4.6L, but it was never offered in the Ford F-150.

Fuel System:

Electronic, sequential multiport fuel injection

Oil Capacity:

6 quarts w/ filter

Horsepower:

220 hp @ 4,750 rpm (F-150 2v, 1997)
292 hp @ 5,700 rpm (F-150 3v, 2010)

Torque:

265 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm (F-150 2v, 1997)
320 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm (F-150 3v, 2010)

Applications:

Ford F-150, Ford cars (including Mustang), Ford Expedition

 

 

5.4L V-8 Specs

Engine:

5.4L 16v SOHC, 24v SOHC, 32v DOHC V-8

Production Plants:

2v produced at Windsor Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario
3v produced at Essex Engine Plant in Windsor, Ontario

Displacement:

5.4 liters, 330 cubic inches

Block Material:

Cast iron

Cylinder Head Material:

Aluminum

Firing Order:

1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8

Bore:

3.55 inches

Stroke:

4.17 inches

Deck Height:

10.079 inches

Compression Ratio:

9.8 : 1

Valvetrain:

Single overhead camshaft, available in 16 valve (2 valves per cylinder) or 24 valve (3 valves per cylinder). Ford also built a high performance 32 valve 5.4L, but it was never offered in the Ford F-150.

Fuel System:

Electronic, sequential multiport fuel injection

Oil Capacity:

6 quarts w/filter

Horsepower:

235 hp @ 4,250 rpm (1997 2v ratings)
310 hp @ 5,000 rpm (2010 3v ratings)

Torque:

335 lb-ft @ 3,000 rpm (1997 2v ratings)
365 lb-ft @ 3,500 rpm (2010 3v ratings)

Applications:

Ford F series, Expedition, E series, (high performance 4v used in Shelby Mustang and Ford GT)

 

 

5.4L & 4.6L V-8 Power Output Timeline

Timeline represents the horsepower & torque of the 4.6L & 5.4L V-8 when equipped in the Ford F-150 only.

Model Year

4.6L V-8

5.4L V-8

Notes

1997 - 1998

220 hp @ 4,750 rpm
265 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm

235 hp @ 4,250 rpm
335 lb-ft @ 3,000 rpm

 

1999 - 2000

220 hp @ 4,750 rpm
265 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm

260 hp @ 4,500 rpm
350 lb-ft @ 2,500 rpm

 

2001 - 2003

231 hp @ 4,750 rpm
293 lb-ft @ 3,500 rpm

260 hp @ 4,500 rpm
350 lb-ft @ 2,500 rpm

 

2004 -2007

231 hp @ 4,750 rpm
293 lb-ft @ 3,500 rpm

300 hp @ 5,000 rpm
365 lb-ft @ 3,750 rpm

5.4L 24v (3v per cylinder) is introduced.

2008

248 hp @ 4,750 rpm
294 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm

300 hp @ 5,000 rpm
365 lb-ft @ 3,750 rpm

 

2009

292 hp @ 5,700 rpm
320 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm

310 hp @ 5,000 rpm
365 lb0ft @ 3,750 rpm

4.6L 24v (3v per cylinder) is introduced.

2010

292 hp @ 5,700 rpm
320 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm

310 hp @ 5,000 rpm
365 lb-ft @ 3,500 rpm

 

 

Common 4.6L & 5.4L Engine Issues

• Spark plugs stripping cylinder heads: 1997 - 2008 modular engines have a history of stripping the threads for the spark plugs in the cylinder head. The cylinder heads are made of aluminum, a much softer metal than steel, and the spark plugs are only held in place my a few threads. This combination makes it easy to strip the cylinder head during spark plug removal or replacement. Additionally, it is not uncommon for a spark plug to blow out, stripping the heads. This defect is acknowledged by Ford Motor Company as multiple TSB's (technical service bulletin) relate to this issue. A threaded insert is the recommended repair method, & Ford provides a tool kit specifc to this repair procedure.

• Composite intake manifold cracking: 1996 - 2001 Ford 4.6L & 5.4L engines a nylon composite intake manifold produced by DuPont. The intake manifold is prone to cracking, which results in coolant leakage. Ford began installing a revised intake manifold late in the 2001 model year to prevent this issue. A class action lawsuit was filed in behalf of Ford owners and later settled. Owners of problematic model year cars & trucks were elegible to receive an updated intake manifold within 90 days of the settlement.